Drive: The surprising truth about what motivates us

cloudubq:

This is truly amazing. If you pay people enough to take the issue of money off the table, then 3 factors motivate peoples behavior:
1) autonomy
2) mastery
3) purpose
Great video. Well worth the 11 minutes you’ll need to watch it. Pluse the white board illustration style is fun to watch. Thanks Jim for bringing this to my attention.

Originally posted on Jim Gentile:

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MongoDB for the non-technologist – It is not just what we make, it is what we make possible !

cloudubq:

Vijay,

I like your idea of making Mongo more understandable. I know I struggled with it at first. I’ve always had very strong ideas about DB structures. I so agree on the flexibility. It is both exciting and scary at the same time. As a DBA, what am I going to do if I can’t go around telling people NO and how hard my job is when they want to make a change. While I do jest, it is a significant change. A few comments, as you know I would.

Please don’t borrow slogans. It makes you into follower. There are hundreds of ideas along the same line. I always loved the GE one “we bring good things to light.” The double meaning is brilliant. That is what is marvelous about the English language. The real cloud database. An agile database that supporting your inspirations. A DB at the speed of cloud, thought, ideas, inspiration, etc. Give me a call and we can bounce a few ideas.

On the standardization, you failed to mention the why. We standardize to lower complexity and cost. We diversify, creating heterogeneity, because new capabilities come into existence. The computer, and especially the software world, grow exponentially, so there is a universe of temptation out there and more arriving tomorrow. It is every CIO’s constant problem. It is why we drown in a sea of business cases trying to solve the equation where even the constants are changing.

Regardless, good luck at Mongo and it is really cool product. I just have to find an excuse to play with it and better yet put it into a project. I’d like to be the DBA who gets to say “yes” for a change.

Originally posted on Vijay's thoughts on all things big and small:

I borrowed the title from an inspiring Intel slogan from 2008. http://www.intel.com/content/www/us/en/history/history-2008-annual-report.html

How exactly does someone choose one database over another?

That of course depends on who the “someone” is – the answer differs whether you are a developer, and ops person, an architect, an executive or an end user. If you are a developer , an ops person , a consultant or another kind of IT expert, and you are reading this – you probably already know why you chose MongoDB over other databases. Your next step is probably to convince someone else on “why MongoDB “ . And typically that person does not come with deep technical background like you do.

A good part of my job is to explain to our partners and customers what is new and different with MongoDB – in non technical terms . And having done that a few times now – I…

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Production HANA on VMware – for the few, for now

Production HANA on VMware is in “controlled availability, allowing selected customers, depending on their scenarios and system sizes to go live with SAP HANA on VMware vSphere immediately” per SAP OSS Note: 1788665 - SAP HANA Support for VMware vSphere Environments.  However, the SAP marketing team left this small stipulation off the press release and got everyone very hot and bothered.

It sounds like everyone should be able to put their HANA system on VMware.  First, my wife, who is not in the IT world, sent me a link to the NY Times SAP and VMware Head for the Future Together and then I got about dozen copies of the Market Watch Report: SAP and VMware Announce SAP HANA® for Production Use on VMware vSphere 5.5.  Well, at least that mentioned you needed the latest version of VMware.

So for now, if you want to production HANA on VMware, the main requirements are below and included in SAP OSS Note: 1788665 - SAP HANA Support for VMware vSphere Environments.

  • Must be approved for controlled availability by SAP
  • Must be on VMware vSphere 5.5
  • Must be on SAP HANA SPS07
  • Maximum of 1 TB
  • Must be on SAP approved HANA server and storage
  • Must comply to SAP’s current recommendations for vCPU and RAM
  • Must not over-provsion the CPU nor RAM
  • Maximum of 1 Virtual Machine (VM)

In other words you need the latest and greatest version of VMware and HANA running on your HANA approved appliance in a nearly non-virtual manner.  While this is less than what we all want, it is a step in the right direction.  It will allow you to manage the HANA instance under your VMware management utilities.  It makes HANA part of your Software Defined Environmental strategy.  I’m confident that over time, as it becomes Generally Available, that production HANA will have far fewer restrictions.

I’m actually looking forward to when we can run production HANA on lots of virtualization schemes.  I look forward to more of software defined service level agreement (SLA) with SAP so that other virtualization environments including the cloud providers can provide production services. Right now it is about shipping hardware to Waldorf, DE for certification and is so specific, it is not practical even for hardware manufactures.

SAP needs to move to software defined SLA would be good for everyone including SAP by making HANA more available and take less effort to certify platforms, hardware and cloud providers who want the ability to vary the make-up of servers based on market conditions and newer evolutions of chipsets, and especially my clients who want HANA, but in but running in a completely virtual word they are defining, not the one SAP is trying to define for them.

As Vishal Sikka (former SAP CTO) exits, limited Production HANA on VMware is great first step for the product he called his child, HANA. Unlimited production HANA on VMware would be a great toddler-hood.  I really look forward to seeing it rapidly reach its teenage years and start trying to run on everything everywhere.  Isn’t that what teenagers do?

 

SAP Sapphire 2014 – a look forward

This is my 13th Sapphire and I still get excited by them.  For me, it is old home week where I get to meet all the people I know, I’ve seen before, and sometimes those that I just get to read about.  Since I’m terrible at names and faces, it is a struggle for me, but it is worth the effort.  Even for the IBMers, I review the roster before I go to make sure I’ve seen the names.  If I can tie the person to idea or something we worked on, I can almost always remember them.

I look forward to walking all the solution booths and listening to the pitches from each company.  Some are great and inciteful.. Most are OK.  A few don’t have clue what an SAP system is or will be.  In that case, I just hope I got the wrong person.  I’m not a fan of the professional showperson booths, but some are entertaining.  I prefer to speak with the experts on the topic.

I’m not happy that some of my favorite vendors are not going to be at the show because SAP is limiting the application life cycle management (ALM) vendors at least according to the the exhibitor guide.  I’m rather disappointed when IntelliCorp (http://intellicorp.com/), Realtech (http://www.realtech.com/wInternational/index.php), and Panaya (http://panaya.com/) are not permitted to attend and put up booth.  I’ve seen 100′s of companies benefit from their tools.  If SAP wants to beat them with better tools – go for it.  I don’t like seeing software that benefits my clients being pushed out by marketing rules.

Specifically, for Panaya, I have a lot experience.  They are part of the IBM SAP and Oracle Upgrade methodology and we’ve added them for automated manual testing.  Specific to SAP, they are limited to ECC, but they do a great job and far better than Solution Manager. Now we are looking to work with them on Quality Management of SAP systems.  There use of cloud and collecting the “wisdom of the cloud” or crowd-sourcing knowledge is leading edge for the SAP world.  So why wouldn’t clients want to hear?  Clients are happy to benefit from previous clients’ works and even share if they think they’ll get something back of equal or greater merit.

Beyond that, there are lots of great stuff coming from SAP, IBM, and others.  If you want to hear a little more about IBM’s content, please follow my blog at IBM Insights on Business (http://insights-on-business.com/sap-consulting/ibm-at-sap-sapphire-in-orlando-june-3-5-2014/).  I should get at least one more out before the show and a few afterwards.

I’ll be spending MOST of my time around the IBM booth area.  Please do come by and ask for me, Chuck Kichler, by name.  I’d love to hear what you think about this blog, about SAP, and about IBM, to discuss your problems or ideas, or just to say hello.  Bring your business card, too.  I’ll want to write what we discussed on the back, so I can remember you, and maybe we can even do some business.

Chuck Kichler

Chuck Kichler

And, yes, I am almost up to taking pictures and using Evernote Hello (http://evernote.com/hello/), but this seems a little too big brother for me at this point.  If you are using it, can you let me know how people react to the picture part?

See you at Sapphire NOW in Orlando on June 3 – 5, 2014.

Jon Stewart and the Food Babe, or: toxins in your tea

cloudubq:

At heart, I am a scientist. This blog makes me proud. Using the known universe to learn about the rest of the known universe. A plodding methodical set of steps in the best direction possible until more information provides a better direction.

Originally posted on Puff the Mutant Dragon:

Let me start by saying I truly love the Daily Show. Jon Stewart cracks me up, and together with MSN (my homepage) and Facebook, he’s one of my three main sources of political news. His focus, of course, is politics not science, and that’s why although his satire is reliably hilarious, when it comes to scientific & public health controversies he tends to shoot a little wide of the mark.

Take, for example, the chemical azodicarbonamide. Recently Stewart decried its presence in Subway sandwich bread because it’s also found in yoga mats, which to him proved it was dangerous — no more needed to be said. But wait a minute. Gypsum is both a food additive and an industrial chemical used to make drywall; does Stewart think it should be banned too? While we’re at it why not ban salt? they use that to make chlorine gas through electrolysis…

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The execution challenge – are you a leader or a 3 year old ?

cloudubq:

Vijay, Great blog. Few key thoughts. Some leaders got to their position based on single really good decision or achievement (sold big deal X) and now have no idea how to repeat. The largest group of leaders, have achieved their level by working under a single business / technology condition (dot.com, global SAP in major corporations, portals, etc.). I find this may be 60 – 75% of managers and execs. These leaders are not weighing all the facts. Instead they are pursuing it through a VERY narrow lens, get frustrated when they can’t fit their expectations to reality, and rather than adjust and lead, they lash out as 3 year olds. If you read Nate Silver. He talks about different information styles – Hedgehogs and Foxes. Most leaders, unfortunately, are hedgehogs. They go big and fail. They hang on any news they are right. Foxes instead fight like heck for an idea, but when presented with new, good information adjust. We tend to idolize the hedgehogs and call foxes “flip floppers”, but you really do want to work for leader who is a fox or lucky hedgehog who happens to be in the perfect time slot.

Originally posted on Vijay's thoughts on all things big and small:

Everyone likes their leaders to take fast decisions and then stick by the decision in the face of diversity . They like leaders to be proactive and everyone else to be reactionary. Guess what – that is also how three year olds generally work ! But you don’t want your leaders to behave like a three year old , do you ?

Sadly, this is rather common and many of us would have had a boss who acted this way . I certainly had – more than once !

There are a few things that can (and should ) differentiate a leader from a three year old .

1. Ability to change course when needed

Despite best of intentions, some times we have to take decisions that are awful . But unlike a three year old who would just throw a tantrum when challenged – a leader should listen patiently…

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